Learning Linux

We are currently in the process of migrating our HOWTO articles to a new CCIS Knowledgebase. The content of this page has been moved to the following KB article:

KB0012107: Learning Linux

Click here to expand the deprecated HOWTO page

At the College of Computer and Information Science, your lab and classwork may require the use of our Linux environment in order to complete your assignments. This page will serve as a pointer to materials that can be referenced in order for you to complete your assignments. Once you have a CCIS account, you will be able to utilize SSH or one of the machines in our Linux lab to log in and follow along with the Tutorials presented below.

Where do I go to follow along with these tutorials?

There are many ways to run these tutorials, a few include:
1) Utilizing an SSH client such as PuTTY (manual here) from a Windows machine to SSH into login.ccs.neu.edu using your CCIS username and password.
2) Opening up a Terminal window on your OSX-based laptop or desktop. *DISCLAIMER* Please be very careful with any commands you run on your own machine as data-loss or system errors may occur if commands are used improperly.
3) Logging into one of our Linux machines in the 102 computer lab and opening up a Terminal window.

Tutorials

These sites offer excellent UNIX and Linux tutorials that can be covered at your own pace:
UNIX Tutorial for Beginners
UNIX/Linux Tutorial Materials

Video Tutorials

There are many sites that offer information and tutorials on UNIX/Linux, a short series of tutorial videos can be found here:
The Unix Shell.

Stanford University also hosts an OpenClassroom course entitled Practical Unix which can be accessed here: Practical Unix.

Reference Book

An extremely useful book, entitled Learning the UNIX Operating System is a strongly recommended purchase to serve as reference material for utilizing Linux machines.

From the author:

If you are new to Unix, this concise book will tell you just what you need to get started and no more. Unix was one of the first operating systems written in C, a high-level programming language, and its natural portability and low price made it a popular choice among universities. Initially, two main dialects of Unix existed: one produced by AT&T known as System V, and one developed at UC Berkeley and known as BSD. In recent years, many other dialects have been created, including the highly popular Linux operating system and the new Mac OS X (a derivative of BSD).Learning the Unix Operating System is a handy book for someone just starting with Unix or Linux, and it’s an ideal primer for Mac and PC users of the Internet who need to know a little about Unix on the systems they visit.

As of this writing, this book can be purchased on Amazon for roughly 16$ here: Learning the UNIX Operating System

This is a small subset of the information available out there for learning UNIX/Linux and we encourage you to research further after covering these basic tutorials.

The links on this page were active as of 7/1/2014

Comments on this entry are closed.